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Give Rotisserie Chicken an Asian Twist with Gochujang and Sesame

Spicy and packed with umami flavor, gochujang is a staple in Korean cuisine that can instantly elevate any dish.

This fermented paste made from soybeans, salt, and chilies has a wonderfully complex and funky taste that can transform a simple store-bought rotisserie chicken into an exciting and flavorful meal.

In this recipe, we combine gochujang with other essential Korean ingredients such as ginger, scallions, sesame oil, and sesame seeds to create a delicious cabbage and chicken salad.

Making the dressing is quick and easy, and once it’s ready, you simply need to thinly slice the cabbage, shred the chicken, and grate a carrot for added color and sweetness. Optionally, you can garnish the salad with walnuts or extra sesame seeds for added texture and nuttiness.

For the full recipe and instructions, you can visit the original article.

Preparation time: 30 minutes

Servings: 4 to 6

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons gochujang
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed or other neutral oil
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil, plus more to serve
  • ¼ cup unseasoned rice vinegar OR cider vinegar
  • Kosher salt and ground black pepper
  • 1 pound green cabbage, thinly sliced (about 4 cups)
  • 3 cups shredded cooked chicken
  • 1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced on the diagonal OR 1 large grated carrot OR both

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together gochujang, neutral oil, sugar, ginger, sesame oil, vinegar, ¼ teaspoon salt, and ½ teaspoon pepper.
  2. Add the cabbage, chicken, and half of the scallions; toss to combine. Taste and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Transfer to a serving dish, drizzle with additional sesame oil, and sprinkle with the remaining scallions.
  4. Optionally, garnish with toasted sesame seeds or walnuts.

For more recipes and dinner ideas, visit the food section of The Washington Times.

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